West Buechel: State Suspends Road Aid Payments

The Commonwealth of Kentucky has suspended making monthly Road Aid payment to the City of West Buechel due to the City’s failure to submit a Uniform Financial Information Report (UFIR) for FY 2014-2015. The last Road Aid payment was made in May, 2016.

The City cannot submit a UFIR for FY 2014-2015 until that year’s Financial Statements have been audited by an independent CPA as required by law. Our repeated requests to inspect the City’s Financial Statements for FY 2014-2015 have gone unanswered. The Financial Statement required by KRS 424.220 should have been finalized and published a year ago. An independent audit of the City’s Financial Statements cannot begin if the Financial Statements do not yet exist.

The State Road Aid allocated to West Buechel will continue to accumulate. Those funds, which are about $2,000 per month, will not be paid to West Buechel until the City gets its financial reporting in proper order and a UFIR is submitted.

West Buechel Late Pay Update

We previously reported $5,000 in late fees imposed upon the City of West Buechel by Kentucky Retirement Systems because of Kimberly R. Richards’ multiple failures to report or pay retirement contributions on time. See: Gross Negligence.  Ms. Richards has been City Clerk-Treasurer for West Buechel since Richard W. Richards took office as Mayor in January, 2015. She continues in that position with an annual salary in excess of $60,000.

By a recent Open Records request to Kentucky Retirement Systems, we have been advised that an additional $1,000 late penalty has been imposed.



2016-05-KRS-PenaltyInvoice (Text)

The two required reports and the contribution payment for May, 2016, were six days late. The City has not paid any of the accumulated $6,000 in fines.

Government Regulations

This is not a political rant against the evils of government regulations, and it is not a defense or justification for government controls either. This is merely a recognition that government bureaucrats at all levels, from local to national, have their fingers in nearly every pie.

It is a simple undeniable fact of modern life in the United States of America: There are a lot of rules. All these rules can be a pain in the neck if you are in business, but the rules can be used to your advantage if you are just an ordinary consumer.  There aren’t many professions or skilled trades that are free of government oversight.

Here is an incomplete list of occupations that Kentucky state laws have something to say about:

  1. Alcohol Counselors
  2. Applied Behavior Analysts
  3. Architects
  4. Art Therapist
  5. Auctioneers
  6. Audiologists
  7. Barbers
  8. Charities
  9. Child Care Centers
  10. Chiropractors
  11. Corporations
  12. Cosmetologists
  13. Dental Specialists
  14. Dentists
  15. Dietitians
  16. Driver Training Instructors
  17. Driver Training Schools
  18. Drug Counselors
  19. Electricians
  20. Embalmers
  21. Emergency Medical Services
  22. Estheticians
  23. Funeral Directors
  24. HVAC Contractors
  25. Interpretation For The Deaf
  26. Land Surveyors
  27. Landscape Architecture
  28. Lawyers
  29. Licensed Diabetes Educators
  30. Lie Detector Examiners
  31. Massage Therapist
  32. Medical Imaging
  33. Medical Laboratories
  34. Nursing Homes
  35. Nutritionists
  36. Occupational Therapists
  37. Ophthalmic Dispensers
  38. Optometrists
  39. Orthotists
  40. Osteopaths
  41. Pedorthists
  42. Pharmacies
  43. Pharmacists
  44. Physical Therapists
  45. Physicians
  46. Plumbers
  47. Podiatrists
  48. Practical Nurses
  49. Private Investigators
  50. Professional Counselors
  51. Professional Engineers
  52. Professional Geologists
  53. Prosthetists
  54. Psychologists
  55. Public Accountants
  56. Radiation Therapy
  57. Real Estate Appraisers
  58. Real Estate Brokers
  59. Real Estate Salesmen
  60. Registered Nurses
  61. Respiratory Care Practitioners
  62. Social Workers
  63. Specialists In Hearing Aids
  64. Speech Pathologists
  65. Veterinarians

Every one of these business trades and professions is regulated by a government agency in some way. Some are more tightly controlled than others, but each in its own way has a higher authority in a position to yank their leash if they misbehave.

What does this mean for you?

If someone treats you badly or unfairly, usually there is something you can do about it. The trick is to know what to complain about, how to complain and where to send it.